My Life, A History

My Life, A History

just—history:

The newly liberated people of Antwerp show their feelings towards their once German occupiers by locking them in the Lion’s cage at the city zoo, 1944.[796x800]

just—history:

The newly liberated people of Antwerp show their feelings towards their once German occupiers by locking them in the Lion’s cage at the city zoo, 1944.[796x800]

spookyelle:

Unearthing underwater lost cities
Franck Goddio is an underwater explorer, who amongst the shipwrecks he has found unearthed an ancient Egyptian city called Thonis-Heracleion.
Found off the coast of Egypt, this port city was build around 800 BC.
It is thought that it may have become submerged following an earthquake.
See more and source here
spookyelle:

Unearthing underwater lost cities
Franck Goddio is an underwater explorer, who amongst the shipwrecks he has found unearthed an ancient Egyptian city called Thonis-Heracleion.
Found off the coast of Egypt, this port city was build around 800 BC.
It is thought that it may have become submerged following an earthquake.
See more and source here
spookyelle:

Unearthing underwater lost cities
Franck Goddio is an underwater explorer, who amongst the shipwrecks he has found unearthed an ancient Egyptian city called Thonis-Heracleion.
Found off the coast of Egypt, this port city was build around 800 BC.
It is thought that it may have become submerged following an earthquake.
See more and source here

spookyelle:

Unearthing underwater lost cities

Franck Goddio is an underwater explorer, who amongst the shipwrecks he has found unearthed an ancient Egyptian city called Thonis-Heracleion.

Found off the coast of Egypt, this port city was build around 800 BC.

It is thought that it may have become submerged following an earthquake.

See more and source here

huffpostworld:

This video shows London in 1924 and 2014 simultaneously - and it’s stunning.
huffpostworld:

This video shows London in 1924 and 2014 simultaneously - and it’s stunning.
huffpostworld:

This video shows London in 1924 and 2014 simultaneously - and it’s stunning.
huffpostworld:

This video shows London in 1924 and 2014 simultaneously - and it’s stunning.

huffpostworld:

This video shows London in 1924 and 2014 simultaneously - and it’s stunning.

(via scootius)

imperatortrajun:

HOLY SHIT. JOFFREY LOOKS EXACTLY LIKE CALIGULA.
It all makes perfect sense now….
I am thoroughly terrified.

This is amazing

imperatortrajun:

HOLY SHIT. JOFFREY LOOKS EXACTLY LIKE CALIGULA.
It all makes perfect sense now….
I am thoroughly terrified.

This is amazing

historicaltimes:


"Balloons starting to rise in balloon race", Berlin, 1908 Read More

historicaltimes:

"Balloons starting to rise in balloon race", Berlin, 1908

Read More

peremadeleine:

elizabeth-karenina asked: Eighteenth or Nineteenth Century
Pictured [not in chronological order]:
French fashion plate (1700-89)
Benjamin Franklin publishes a political cartoon advocating colonial unity (1754)
Westover Plantation house constructed in Virginia (c. 1750)
François Boucher’s Rococo painting “The Love Letter” (1750)
Construction of the Catherine Palace in Tsarskoe Selo [outside St. Petersburg, Russia] completed (1756)
A General History of the Pyrates published (1724) —the “Golden Age” of Piracy spanned from 1716-1726
Old Town, Alexandria, Virginia (originally planned in 1749)
The U.S. Declaration of Independence (1776)
The Women’s March to Versailles (1789)
peremadeleine:

elizabeth-karenina asked: Eighteenth or Nineteenth Century
Pictured [not in chronological order]:
French fashion plate (1700-89)
Benjamin Franklin publishes a political cartoon advocating colonial unity (1754)
Westover Plantation house constructed in Virginia (c. 1750)
François Boucher’s Rococo painting “The Love Letter” (1750)
Construction of the Catherine Palace in Tsarskoe Selo [outside St. Petersburg, Russia] completed (1756)
A General History of the Pyrates published (1724) —the “Golden Age” of Piracy spanned from 1716-1726
Old Town, Alexandria, Virginia (originally planned in 1749)
The U.S. Declaration of Independence (1776)
The Women’s March to Versailles (1789)
peremadeleine:

elizabeth-karenina asked: Eighteenth or Nineteenth Century
Pictured [not in chronological order]:
French fashion plate (1700-89)
Benjamin Franklin publishes a political cartoon advocating colonial unity (1754)
Westover Plantation house constructed in Virginia (c. 1750)
François Boucher’s Rococo painting “The Love Letter” (1750)
Construction of the Catherine Palace in Tsarskoe Selo [outside St. Petersburg, Russia] completed (1756)
A General History of the Pyrates published (1724) —the “Golden Age” of Piracy spanned from 1716-1726
Old Town, Alexandria, Virginia (originally planned in 1749)
The U.S. Declaration of Independence (1776)
The Women’s March to Versailles (1789)

peremadeleine:

elizabeth-karenina asked: Eighteenth or Nineteenth Century

Pictured [not in chronological order]:

  • French fashion plate (1700-89)
  • Benjamin Franklin publishes a political cartoon advocating colonial unity (1754)
  • Westover Plantation house constructed in Virginia (c. 1750)
  • François Boucher’s Rococo painting “The Love Letter” (1750)
  • Construction of the Catherine Palace in Tsarskoe Selo [outside St. Petersburg, Russia] completed (1756)
  • A General History of the Pyrates published (1724) —the “Golden Age” of Piracy spanned from 1716-1726
  • Old Town, Alexandria, Virginia (originally planned in 1749)
  • The U.S. Declaration of Independence (1776)
  • The Women’s March to Versailles (1789)

ACLW Day 2 - Things We Lost In The Fire

o-eheu:

Things we lost to the flames
Things we’ll never see again
All that we’ve amassed
Sits before us, shattered into ash”

—Bastille, Things We Lost In The Fire

image

If I owned a TARDIS, the first place I would go would absolutely be the Library of Alexandria.

The Library of Alexandria…

skunkbear:

The recent release of “Dawn of the Planet of the Apes" reminded me of one of my favorite ape vs. man films – this 1932 video that shows a baby chimpanzee and a baby human undergoing the same basic psychological tests.

Its gets weirder – the human baby (Donald) and the chimpanzee baby (Gua) were both raised as humans by their biological/adopted father Winthrop Niles Kellogg.  Kellogg was a comparative psychologist fascinated by the interplay between nature and nurture, and he devised a fascinating (and questionably ethical) experiment to study it:

Suppose an anthropoid were taken into a typical human family at the day of birth and reared as a child. Suppose he were fed upon a bottle, clothed, washed, bathed, fondled, and given a characteristically human environment; that he were spoken to like the human infant from the moment of parturition; that he had an adopted human mother and an adopted human father.

First, Kellogg had to convince his pregnant wife he wasn’t crazy:

 …the enthusiasm of one of us met with so much resistance from the other that it appeared likely we could never come to an agreement upon whether or not we should even attempt such an undertaking.

She apparently gave in, because Donald and Gua were raised, for nine months, as brother and sister. Much like Caesar in the “Planet of the Apes” movies, Gua developed faster than her “brother,” and often outperformed him in tasks. But she soon hit a cognitive wall, and the experiment came to an end. (Probably for the best, as Donald had begun to speak chimpanzee.)
You can read more about Kellogg’s experiment, its legacy, and public reaction to it here.
skunkbear:

The recent release of “Dawn of the Planet of the Apes" reminded me of one of my favorite ape vs. man films – this 1932 video that shows a baby chimpanzee and a baby human undergoing the same basic psychological tests.

Its gets weirder – the human baby (Donald) and the chimpanzee baby (Gua) were both raised as humans by their biological/adopted father Winthrop Niles Kellogg.  Kellogg was a comparative psychologist fascinated by the interplay between nature and nurture, and he devised a fascinating (and questionably ethical) experiment to study it:

Suppose an anthropoid were taken into a typical human family at the day of birth and reared as a child. Suppose he were fed upon a bottle, clothed, washed, bathed, fondled, and given a characteristically human environment; that he were spoken to like the human infant from the moment of parturition; that he had an adopted human mother and an adopted human father.

First, Kellogg had to convince his pregnant wife he wasn’t crazy:

 …the enthusiasm of one of us met with so much resistance from the other that it appeared likely we could never come to an agreement upon whether or not we should even attempt such an undertaking.

She apparently gave in, because Donald and Gua were raised, for nine months, as brother and sister. Much like Caesar in the “Planet of the Apes” movies, Gua developed faster than her “brother,” and often outperformed him in tasks. But she soon hit a cognitive wall, and the experiment came to an end. (Probably for the best, as Donald had begun to speak chimpanzee.)
You can read more about Kellogg’s experiment, its legacy, and public reaction to it here.
skunkbear:

The recent release of “Dawn of the Planet of the Apes" reminded me of one of my favorite ape vs. man films – this 1932 video that shows a baby chimpanzee and a baby human undergoing the same basic psychological tests.

Its gets weirder – the human baby (Donald) and the chimpanzee baby (Gua) were both raised as humans by their biological/adopted father Winthrop Niles Kellogg.  Kellogg was a comparative psychologist fascinated by the interplay between nature and nurture, and he devised a fascinating (and questionably ethical) experiment to study it:

Suppose an anthropoid were taken into a typical human family at the day of birth and reared as a child. Suppose he were fed upon a bottle, clothed, washed, bathed, fondled, and given a characteristically human environment; that he were spoken to like the human infant from the moment of parturition; that he had an adopted human mother and an adopted human father.

First, Kellogg had to convince his pregnant wife he wasn’t crazy:

 …the enthusiasm of one of us met with so much resistance from the other that it appeared likely we could never come to an agreement upon whether or not we should even attempt such an undertaking.

She apparently gave in, because Donald and Gua were raised, for nine months, as brother and sister. Much like Caesar in the “Planet of the Apes” movies, Gua developed faster than her “brother,” and often outperformed him in tasks. But she soon hit a cognitive wall, and the experiment came to an end. (Probably for the best, as Donald had begun to speak chimpanzee.)
You can read more about Kellogg’s experiment, its legacy, and public reaction to it here.
skunkbear:

The recent release of “Dawn of the Planet of the Apes" reminded me of one of my favorite ape vs. man films – this 1932 video that shows a baby chimpanzee and a baby human undergoing the same basic psychological tests.

Its gets weirder – the human baby (Donald) and the chimpanzee baby (Gua) were both raised as humans by their biological/adopted father Winthrop Niles Kellogg.  Kellogg was a comparative psychologist fascinated by the interplay between nature and nurture, and he devised a fascinating (and questionably ethical) experiment to study it:

Suppose an anthropoid were taken into a typical human family at the day of birth and reared as a child. Suppose he were fed upon a bottle, clothed, washed, bathed, fondled, and given a characteristically human environment; that he were spoken to like the human infant from the moment of parturition; that he had an adopted human mother and an adopted human father.

First, Kellogg had to convince his pregnant wife he wasn’t crazy:

 …the enthusiasm of one of us met with so much resistance from the other that it appeared likely we could never come to an agreement upon whether or not we should even attempt such an undertaking.

She apparently gave in, because Donald and Gua were raised, for nine months, as brother and sister. Much like Caesar in the “Planet of the Apes” movies, Gua developed faster than her “brother,” and often outperformed him in tasks. But she soon hit a cognitive wall, and the experiment came to an end. (Probably for the best, as Donald had begun to speak chimpanzee.)
You can read more about Kellogg’s experiment, its legacy, and public reaction to it here.
skunkbear:

The recent release of “Dawn of the Planet of the Apes" reminded me of one of my favorite ape vs. man films – this 1932 video that shows a baby chimpanzee and a baby human undergoing the same basic psychological tests.

Its gets weirder – the human baby (Donald) and the chimpanzee baby (Gua) were both raised as humans by their biological/adopted father Winthrop Niles Kellogg.  Kellogg was a comparative psychologist fascinated by the interplay between nature and nurture, and he devised a fascinating (and questionably ethical) experiment to study it:

Suppose an anthropoid were taken into a typical human family at the day of birth and reared as a child. Suppose he were fed upon a bottle, clothed, washed, bathed, fondled, and given a characteristically human environment; that he were spoken to like the human infant from the moment of parturition; that he had an adopted human mother and an adopted human father.

First, Kellogg had to convince his pregnant wife he wasn’t crazy:

 …the enthusiasm of one of us met with so much resistance from the other that it appeared likely we could never come to an agreement upon whether or not we should even attempt such an undertaking.

She apparently gave in, because Donald and Gua were raised, for nine months, as brother and sister. Much like Caesar in the “Planet of the Apes” movies, Gua developed faster than her “brother,” and often outperformed him in tasks. But she soon hit a cognitive wall, and the experiment came to an end. (Probably for the best, as Donald had begun to speak chimpanzee.)
You can read more about Kellogg’s experiment, its legacy, and public reaction to it here.
skunkbear:

The recent release of “Dawn of the Planet of the Apes" reminded me of one of my favorite ape vs. man films – this 1932 video that shows a baby chimpanzee and a baby human undergoing the same basic psychological tests.

Its gets weirder – the human baby (Donald) and the chimpanzee baby (Gua) were both raised as humans by their biological/adopted father Winthrop Niles Kellogg.  Kellogg was a comparative psychologist fascinated by the interplay between nature and nurture, and he devised a fascinating (and questionably ethical) experiment to study it:

Suppose an anthropoid were taken into a typical human family at the day of birth and reared as a child. Suppose he were fed upon a bottle, clothed, washed, bathed, fondled, and given a characteristically human environment; that he were spoken to like the human infant from the moment of parturition; that he had an adopted human mother and an adopted human father.

First, Kellogg had to convince his pregnant wife he wasn’t crazy:

 …the enthusiasm of one of us met with so much resistance from the other that it appeared likely we could never come to an agreement upon whether or not we should even attempt such an undertaking.

She apparently gave in, because Donald and Gua were raised, for nine months, as brother and sister. Much like Caesar in the “Planet of the Apes” movies, Gua developed faster than her “brother,” and often outperformed him in tasks. But she soon hit a cognitive wall, and the experiment came to an end. (Probably for the best, as Donald had begun to speak chimpanzee.)
You can read more about Kellogg’s experiment, its legacy, and public reaction to it here.
skunkbear:

The recent release of “Dawn of the Planet of the Apes" reminded me of one of my favorite ape vs. man films – this 1932 video that shows a baby chimpanzee and a baby human undergoing the same basic psychological tests.

Its gets weirder – the human baby (Donald) and the chimpanzee baby (Gua) were both raised as humans by their biological/adopted father Winthrop Niles Kellogg.  Kellogg was a comparative psychologist fascinated by the interplay between nature and nurture, and he devised a fascinating (and questionably ethical) experiment to study it:

Suppose an anthropoid were taken into a typical human family at the day of birth and reared as a child. Suppose he were fed upon a bottle, clothed, washed, bathed, fondled, and given a characteristically human environment; that he were spoken to like the human infant from the moment of parturition; that he had an adopted human mother and an adopted human father.

First, Kellogg had to convince his pregnant wife he wasn’t crazy:

 …the enthusiasm of one of us met with so much resistance from the other that it appeared likely we could never come to an agreement upon whether or not we should even attempt such an undertaking.

She apparently gave in, because Donald and Gua were raised, for nine months, as brother and sister. Much like Caesar in the “Planet of the Apes” movies, Gua developed faster than her “brother,” and often outperformed him in tasks. But she soon hit a cognitive wall, and the experiment came to an end. (Probably for the best, as Donald had begun to speak chimpanzee.)
You can read more about Kellogg’s experiment, its legacy, and public reaction to it here.
skunkbear:

The recent release of “Dawn of the Planet of the Apes" reminded me of one of my favorite ape vs. man films – this 1932 video that shows a baby chimpanzee and a baby human undergoing the same basic psychological tests.

Its gets weirder – the human baby (Donald) and the chimpanzee baby (Gua) were both raised as humans by their biological/adopted father Winthrop Niles Kellogg.  Kellogg was a comparative psychologist fascinated by the interplay between nature and nurture, and he devised a fascinating (and questionably ethical) experiment to study it:

Suppose an anthropoid were taken into a typical human family at the day of birth and reared as a child. Suppose he were fed upon a bottle, clothed, washed, bathed, fondled, and given a characteristically human environment; that he were spoken to like the human infant from the moment of parturition; that he had an adopted human mother and an adopted human father.

First, Kellogg had to convince his pregnant wife he wasn’t crazy:

 …the enthusiasm of one of us met with so much resistance from the other that it appeared likely we could never come to an agreement upon whether or not we should even attempt such an undertaking.

She apparently gave in, because Donald and Gua were raised, for nine months, as brother and sister. Much like Caesar in the “Planet of the Apes” movies, Gua developed faster than her “brother,” and often outperformed him in tasks. But she soon hit a cognitive wall, and the experiment came to an end. (Probably for the best, as Donald had begun to speak chimpanzee.)
You can read more about Kellogg’s experiment, its legacy, and public reaction to it here.

skunkbear:

The recent release of “Dawn of the Planet of the Apes" reminded me of one of my favorite ape vs. man films – this 1932 video that shows a baby chimpanzee and a baby human undergoing the same basic psychological tests.

Its gets weirder – the human baby (Donald) and the chimpanzee baby (Gua) were both raised as humans by their biological/adopted father Winthrop Niles Kellogg.  Kellogg was a comparative psychologist fascinated by the interplay between nature and nurture, and he devised a fascinating (and questionably ethical) experiment to study it:

Suppose an anthropoid were taken into a typical human family at the day of birth and reared as a child. Suppose he were fed upon a bottle, clothed, washed, bathed, fondled, and given a characteristically human environment; that he were spoken to like the human infant from the moment of parturition; that he had an adopted human mother and an adopted human father.

First, Kellogg had to convince his pregnant wife he wasn’t crazy:

 …the enthusiasm of one of us met with so much resistance from the other that it appeared likely we could never come to an agreement upon whether or not we should even attempt such an undertaking.

She apparently gave in, because Donald and Gua were raised, for nine months, as brother and sister. Much like Caesar in the “Planet of the Apes” movies, Gua developed faster than her “brother,” and often outperformed him in tasks. But she soon hit a cognitive wall, and the experiment came to an end. (Probably for the best, as Donald had begun to speak chimpanzee.)

You can read more about Kellogg’s experiment, its legacy, and public reaction to it here.