My Life, A History

My Life, A History

thirtyyearslate:

Colorised photo from the early 1900s. It looks so real, because it actually was!

thirtyyearslate:

Colorised photo from the early 1900s. It looks so real, because it actually was!

kill your curiosity

There’s a story of a Greek and an Italian having an argument over the age old question of who had the superior culture.

The Greek said proudly, “we have the Parthenon.” And the Italian counters with “we have the Colosseum.”

The Greek retorts, “we gave birth to advanced mathematics.”

"Yes," says the Italian, "but we built the Roman Empire."

Finally, the Greek comes up with the clincher. “We invented sex,” he says triumphantly.

"That’s true," the Italian replies, "but we thought of having it with women."

Stephen Fry, QI ‘Greeks’ (via thepudupudu)
atlasofprejudice:

Europe According to the Vikings (1000) from Atlas of Prejudice 2 by Yanko Tsvetkov.

atlasofprejudice:

Europe According to the Vikings (1000) from Atlas of Prejudice 2 by Yanko Tsvetkov.

julieandkat:

I’m with ya, Mr. Henry.
k

julieandkat:

I’m with ya, Mr. Henry.

k

lorenzlammens:

Historians never fully appreciated the humor of the Greeks:

lorenzlammens:

Historians never fully appreciated the humor of the Greeks:

124daisies:

Europe in 450

124daisies:

Europe in 450

coolchicksfromhistory:

Tibors de Sarenom, 12th century
Art by Michelle Dee (tumblr, deviant art)
Tibors or Tiburge de Sarenom is the earliest know trobairitz or female troubadour.  Troubadours were medieval poet-musicians from Occitania, a region encompassing southern France as well as parts of Italy and Spain.  Troubadours composed secular ballads in Occitan, a Romance language native to the area.  Their poems could be intellectual, humorous, and even vulgar, but most focused on courtly love.
Many troubadours came from highborn families.  Tibors was the daughter of Guilhem d’Omelas and Tibors d’Aurenga, two nobles from southern France.  Her younger brother, Raimbaut d’Orange, was also a troubadour.  Tibors married twice and had three sons, one whom became a troubadour. 
Only a single stanza of Tibors work has survived:

Fair, sweet friend, I can truly tell you
I have never been without desire
since I met you and took you as a true lover,
nor has it happened that I lack the wish,
my fair sweet friend, to see you often,
nor has the season come when I repented,
nor has it happened, if you went off angry, 
nor that I knew joy until you had returned,
nor…
(Source: Songs of the Women Troubadours)

coolchicksfromhistory:

Tibors de Sarenom, 12th century

Art by Michelle Dee (tumblr, deviant art)

Tibors or Tiburge de Sarenom is the earliest know trobairitz or female troubadour.  Troubadours were medieval poet-musicians from Occitania, a region encompassing southern France as well as parts of Italy and Spain.  Troubadours composed secular ballads in Occitan, a Romance language native to the area.  Their poems could be intellectual, humorous, and even vulgar, but most focused on courtly love.

Many troubadours came from highborn families.  Tibors was the daughter of Guilhem d’Omelas and Tibors d’Aurenga, two nobles from southern France.  Her younger brother, Raimbaut d’Orange, was also a troubadour.  Tibors married twice and had three sons, one whom became a troubadour. 

Only a single stanza of Tibors work has survived:

Fair, sweet friend, I can truly tell you

I have never been without desire

since I met you and took you as a true lover,

nor has it happened that I lack the wish,

my fair sweet friend, to see you often,

nor has the season come when I repented,

nor has it happened, if you went off angry,

nor that I knew joy until you had returned,

nor…

(Source: Songs of the Women Troubadours)

scootius:

oracleofhistory:

Oh google auto complete, you surprise me every time! 
Who are all these people who want to know about salt during the middle ages?! 



Ah so that explains it! Thanks for clearing that up ;)  

scootius:

oracleofhistory:

Oh google auto complete, you surprise me every time! 

Who are all these people who want to know about salt during the middle ages?! 

image

Ah so that explains it! Thanks for clearing that up ;)